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National Day of Prayer

Posted on May 3, 2018 at 10:08 PM Comments comments (16)
NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER 

Pray for Christian persecution around the world. 

*American Pastor Andrew Brunson critically needs our prayers. Brunson jailed in Turkey.

*Pray for the release of Pastor Bakhrom Kholmatov in Tajikistan

Praise God for Saeed Abedini's release, an Iranian American Christian pastor who was imprisoned in Iran. 

Pray for N. Korean talks

Pray for our nation and our leaders 

Pray for hurting and broken hearted,  the sad and lonely, the undone. 


The Lord is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made. All your works praise you, Lord; your faithful people extol you. They tell of the glory of your kingdom and speak of your might, so that all people may know of your mighty acts and the glorious splendor of your kingdom. Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures through all generations.
Psalm 145

*Devoted  in Prayer, 
           du Padre *

Covetus

Posted on July 2, 2015 at 5:13 PM Comments comments (6)
Beware Of Covetousness
‘You shall not covet your neighbor’s house…your neighbor’s wife… nor anything that is your neighbor’s.’—Exodus 20:17

We’ve all done it, and yet it has been called the sin no one commits. One priest declared that in fifty years of hearing confessions, not one person had ever confessed to committing this sin. Another minister declared that in decades of leading prayer meetings, no one ever mentioned it.

What is this sin? It’s covetousness: desiring another’s possessions, eagerly wishing for what we don’t have. Covetousness is a root sin, a sin committed in the heart that can lead to sins committed outwardly, such as stealing. Covetousness is linked to greed, and the apostle Paul said greed was idolatry.

You can see covetousness everywhere in our culture, including messages that pour out of Madison Avenue. Advertisers prey on our lack for their financial gain. Even bumper stickers often appeal to covetousness, such as the ones that say “Born to shop” or “Whoever dies with the most toys wins.” (I prefer the bumper sticker that says, “He that dies with the most toys wins—nothing.”)
 One day Abraham Lincoln was walking down the street in Springfield, Illinois, holding the hands of his two little boys, who were wailing and crying. A neighbor stepped out of his doorway and said, “Mr. Lincoln, what’s the matter with the boys?” Answered Lincoln, “Just the same things that’s the matter with the whole world: I have three walnuts and each boy wants two!”
So what’s the cure for covetousness? The Bible has the answer. Covetousness, essentially, is fixing our hearts and desires upon the things of this world. But the Bible says, “Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth” (Colossians 3:2). We need to replace covetousness with contentment, our greed with gratitude.

Today ask God to show you whether covetousness is an unconfessed sin in your heart. Then ask for His grace to give you contentment with and gratitude for the gifts He has given you.

D. James Kennedy Ministries' mission is to introduce people to Christ, to nurture and encourage Christians, and to reform cultures.      Copyright ©2015 D. James Kennedy Ministries, All Rights Reserved.


Annual National Day of Prayer is here:

Posted on May 7, 2015 at 2:22 PM Comments comments (5)
Investing in Hope... Transforming our Nation Through Prayer!The 64th Annual National Day of Prayer is here: Thursday, May 7.

Prayer Begins With…A Purpose
  • May 7, 2015

When you come to God, know what you are going to pray about. It is difficult to pray fervently without knowing what you want or desire from God. We should have a clear-cut, well-defined idea about what we are asking God for (being flexible to His leading). “Delight yourself in the Lord and He will give you the desires of your heart” (Psalm 37:4).
You should pray in such a way that you will know afterward what you prayed for, and you will recognize when the answer to your prayer is manifested. Jesus commanded us to specifically ask, seek, and knock (Matthew 7:7). In asking, we must be definite. If it is a good and right request, it is promised to the sincere seeker. In seeking, our goal is to know God and commune with Him. In knocking (intercession), we must understand what the Lord wants to do and pray according to His Word for that thing. The Lord is glad to open the door to every knocking soul. Have faith and enter through holy courage.
Sometimes we do not know what to pray for, and so we can pray in the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:26). Paul stated that he both with the spirit and with the understanding (I Corinthians 14:15). Our whole being, including our minds, should be involved in praying. Our minds should understand what we are asking God for.
The fact remains that when we set ourselves to pray, especially in a group, we must be agreed about what we will pray for (Matthew 18:19). Then watch God work!

Lance Wubbels

This article is part of series on Prayer.
http://nationaldayofprayer.org/prayer-begins-with-a-purpose/
(Taken from “A Time for Prayer” published by Inspired Faith for the National Day of Prayer – used with permission)

Prayer for America

Posted on April 9, 2015 at 2:08 PM Comments comments (6)
A Prayer for AmericaPrayer Begins With…The Holy Spirit

  • March 31, 2015
     "Rather than rushing into God’s presence and saying many things, it is good to quiet your mind and wait in God’s presence so you can feel God’s heart and pray the things that the Holy Spirit shows you to pray for (Habakkuk 2:1). God promises to renew the strength of those who wait patiently on Him (Isaiah 40:31; Psalm 27:14). Through you express to God in a practical way “not my will but Yours be done.” If you are always talking in prayer, you will not be able to hear what God is saying.

Jesus said that the Holy Spirit “will guide you into all the truth” (John 16:13), and He will guide you into an understanding of how to pray. Jude instructs us to “pray in the Holy Spirit “ (v. 20), which means the Spirit of God is “guiding” how we pray and what we pray for. We confess that without the help of the Spirit we cannot pray as we should. The apostle Paul tells us to “pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests” (Ephesians 6:18). The Holy Spirit will lead you the kind of prayer you offer to God. He is the one who motivates and enables and energizes your prayer.

And if you cannot find the right words to pray, know that the Holy Spirit will gladly assist you. “In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express” (Romans 8:26). God sees the longing, the groaning, the desiring, the crying of your heart. He understands without the words. We utterly trust God for His help by the Spirit as we pray, and we consciously depend on His divine working."

  • Lance Wubbels

This article is part five in our 8-part series on Prayer.
  • National Day of Prayer Task Force
  • Articles
(Taken from “A Time for Prayer” published by Inspired Faith for the National Day of Prayer – used with permission) http://nationaldayofprayer.org/prayer-begins-with-the-holy-spirit/

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